MES – Seeing the Big Picture by Looking Small

Posted by John Clemons on May 23, 2012 @ 7:41 am

I’ve said this before- any system, be it MES or MOM or even ERP, if it’s going to be considered successful it has to meet the needs of the organization. It has to actually bring value to the company and do something that the company needs doing and is valuable to the company. Certainly, that’s a lot easier said than done. For MES, it’s even more difficult because there’s really no clear definition of MES and exactly what MES is supposed to do. Of course, that can be a good thing in that MES can actually do a lot of things and can address a lot of different problems. But, as you may suspect, that can be a problem as well. Lots of MES systems are pretty big and have been designed to do lots and lots of things. That’s all good and that means that MES can bring value to the company. And to make MES successful, it means you have to look at the big picture and see what’s... Continue Reading

Continue ReadingLeave a Comment
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Tags: , , , ,

Ten Tips for Successful Team Leadership, Part 1

Posted by Control Engineering Team on May 22, 2012 @ 8:49 am

They say that some are born to lead, but to paraphrase Mr. Orwell’s wonderful line from Animal Farm, “Some leaders are more born than others.” Here are some suggestions of things you can do should you find yourself in a project or team leadership position that will make the experience an enjoyable one for you and your team. 1. Get the big picture. While it may be impossible to be cognizant of all of the details of your project(s), maintain a clear understanding of the scope, major tasks, technologies, and issues involved in the project so that you can offer constructive advice and guidance to your team. If your eyes glaze over while we ask a question, you are not helpful. 2. Provide shelter for your team. When upper management asks for estimates, schedules, resource allocation schemes, and other information, don’t just forward the ... Continue Reading

Continue ReadingLeave a Comment
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Tags: , , , ,

Getting More Out of your Historian – Part 1

Posted by John Clemons on May 17, 2012 @ 7:42 am

You probably already have a data historian of some kind. And, if you don’t, get one! The data historian collects some data and probably gives you some reports and what not and that’s probably about it. It works pretty well. No one ever thinks about it. It just does its job and not much else. That’s pretty typical for most people and their historians. But, it barely touches the hem of the garment to what a historian can do. Data historians are amazing tools and can do so much more than just collect a little bit of data and give you a few reports. Let me give you some ideas. First of all, a data historian is really good at collecting a lot of data, not just a little data, and from a whole bunch of different sources, not just a few. Most historians get installed to address a particular need, as part of a particular project, and they do that well but never get beyond that initial... Continue Reading

Continue ReadingView Comments (2)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Tags: ,

Uncovering Unknown Risks with a Safety Risk Assessment and Analysis

Posted by Gene Niewoehner on May 16, 2012 @ 7:55 am

"Reports that say that something hasn't happened are always interesting to me, because as we know, there are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns -- the ones we don't know we don't know." This quote from former US Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, (Feb. 12, 2002) was the subject of a lot of jokes.  But it's a very accurate summation of what you do and do not know when you kickoff any project. Safety is an obvious component to all project risk mitigation plans. Organizations are compelled by regulatory, financial and other cultural reasons to implement safety risk assessments. The safety assessment and risk analysis becomes an important discipline that reduces the risk of liability duri... Continue Reading

Continue ReadingLeave a Comment
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Tags: , ,

Control is in the Details

Posted by Karl Schrader on May 15, 2012 @ 8:02 am

Over the range of projects we work on, we find ourselves constantly shifting focus from very distant overhead views to the minutest details. For the most part, we tend to relate the big picture information effects to big picture decisions. After all, little detail oriented decisions really only affect a component level change. While we certainly do not hold these guidelines to be law, these concepts oftentimes cloud our judgment and narrow our view of root cause options. Sometimes something small can have a big picture effect. Web handling encoder rounding One of my favorite instances of a very small detail affecting an overall system is one concerning the encoder configuration of a servo motor. This particular problem grew out of a need for frequent tooling changes on a web handling machine that operated continuously. It was used to cut a web into sheets with a ve... Continue Reading

Continue ReadingLeave a Comment
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Tags: , ,