Managing CIP Connections

Posted by John Boyd on December 2, 2014 @ 2:34 pm

Properly managing your control system CIP connections can help avoid confusion and other complications within a process automation project.

Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) is used on industrial automation application networks—such as Ethernet/IP, DeviceNet, and ControlNet—and is supported by ODVA. A CIP connection is a connection between two devices on a CIP-enabled network. This could be between two programmable automation controllers (PACs), between a PAC and a communication module, or between a remote rack communication module and an analog card in its rack (see Figure 1). A CIP connection is a connection between two devices on a CIP-enabled network. Cou... <a class=Continue Reading

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Using programming standards to navigate your process

Posted by John Athy on November 26, 2014 @ 9:31 am

A definite set of programming and HMI standards can alleviate the burden of navigating your controls process from start to finish.

Imagine you had to navigate from one corner of London to the opposite corner, using only a map. No problem, but what if each square mile of this map was designed by a separate person using different scales, symbols, and languages. Now the task becomes more daunting. This analogy can also apply to process automation, specifically with regards to programming and human machine interface (HMI) development. Not having a defined set of programming and HMI standards can lead to a piecemeal set of systems in the overall process that can leave programmers, maintenance, and operations personal with the burden of navigating through the controls process from start to finish. The key to alleviate this burden is to have a uniform "map;" this is where programmi... Continue Reading

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When “Just Fine” Isn’t Good Enough: HMI Design and Development

Posted by Chad Harper on November 24, 2014 @ 12:53 pm

“Please don’t talk to me about technologies that can improve my plant’s performance. I can’t stand the idea of disrupting my current situation with anything new, even if it’s better.” “So, how is the plant running these days?” “Just fine.” Unfortunately, this imagined dialogue isn’t all that imaginary. Despite the great progress we’ve made in technology, process engineering, safety and abnormal situation management, we have little to show for it in the process industries. So where did we go off track — and what can we do about it? How do we convince our peers that merely satisfactory or acceptable performance is not enough? A demographic shift in the workforce Not too long ago, production companies had buildings full of engineers who worked tirelessly on innovative techniques and new ways to optimize their processes. This required... Continue Reading

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Factory acceptance testing with system simulators

Posted by Jeff Wood on November 18, 2014 @ 1:56 pm

System simulators allow developers to test most of a new control system, but not the entire system. See 6 tips for the factory acceptance test (FAT) phase of your project.

Virtual machines and control system simulation have been a great help in checking out systems during development. These have allowed the developer to be able to check out the control system code prior to installation. Most factory acceptance tests (FATs) are conducted using a simulated system or part of the real system that will be used for final installation. Over the past several years I have developed several new plant control systems using system simulators. Although this allows the developer to check out most of the system it does not check out the entire system. I have heard several times during the site acceptance test (SAT) or commissioning phase of the project: “I thought the system was complet... Continue Reading

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Hazards encountered in industrial automation

Posted by Evan Pederson on November 11, 2014 @ 11:39 am

Recognizing safety hazards is important in any work environment—in the office, commissioning on the factory floor, or in the middle of construction. See 5 tips on avoiding common vulnerabilities.engineer

Safety is a topic we hear about often in the modern workplace. Industry rules and standards about equipment and procedures address common risks, and are continually evolving to address new ones. But one component of safety that depends on the individual is the need to stay aware of one’s surroundings. Learning what things to be on the lookout for is therefore critical, and it’s an ongoing process. For those of us in the industrial automation business, there are some unique factors that affect the hazards we ... Continue Reading

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